Friday

February 14, 2014

By Rosanne Prinsen, MSc

Alberta Centre for Active Living

Note: Where possible, we provide the DOI link to research papers in the Info Round-Up.  To use it, cut and paste the DOI into the text box on this webpage: http://dx.doi.org/.  Access to research articles will be dependent on your institutional rights.

ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION
The national ‘Active Travel and Health' group has produced three briefings on walking and cycling for local authorities. The briefings are in the form of short Powerpoint presentations and bring together all the latest evidence, policy and ideas on active travel. They are designed to help local authorities make the case for action to increase walking and cycling. They have been produced in consultation with local authorities and with the input of a wide group of people interested in active travel.

The damage done by suburban sprawl fueled by this (automobile) “inexpensive” form of transportation is finally being challenged; We now know about the health risks of inactive lifestyles so typical of an autocentric way of life. The best cities in the world are those that are walkable - but also those which have high rates of cycling as a daily form of transportation….

Lots of great resources here!

Vision Statement for a Walkable America: By 2020, walking in everyday life is embraced across America. Streets and neighborhoods are safe and attractive public places that encourage people of all ages, abilities, ethnicities, and incomes to walk for exercise, recreation, and transportation. Walkable community policies promote health, economic vitality, environmental sustainability, and social equity.

The project is being spearheaded by Dr. Farnaz Sadeghpour in the Schulich School of Engineering and is designed to teach engineering students the importance of engaging with the community and users before designing solutions to real-life civic problems. The nice side-benefit to the project is that it gathers data on winter cycling in Calgary.

BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Cdn J of Public Health Vol 103, No 9 (2012) Suppl 3
The articles in this supplement present current Canadian evidence supporting the impact of the built environment on health, particularly with regard to child health and obesity. Collectively, these works represent the contributions of multidisciplinary teams of researchers from all five regions of Canada and offer evidence linking various aspects of built and food environments (defined around neighbourhoods and schools) and community design, and their impact on active transportation, physical activity, diet and obesity.

An analysis of seven case studies and recommendations for change

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011; 8: 125
Most associations between the built environment and physical activity were in the expected direction or null. Land use mix, connectivity and population density and overall neighborhood design were however, important determinants of physical activity. The built environment was more likely to be associated with transportation walking compared with other types of physical activity including recreational walking.

New report from the Building Healthy Places Initiative, released at ULI’s 2013 Fall Meeting in Chicago, links global health trends to our built environment.

The floor of our city is our “common wealth” – it belongs to all of us. Whether we paint it, or make it beautiful for special community events, or pave it permanently with patterns and emblems, we are celebrating our shared places and claiming the public realm for pedestrians – for all of us – to socialize, to celebrate, and to enjoy together.

Part two discusses the use of colour on buildings to create a sense of place….. In St. John’s, Newfoundland, the waterfront and Jelly Bean Row area include lots of colorful rowhouses…

CHILDREN
Powerpoint presentations from the 2014 Canadian Sport for Life Summit are now posted.

ARPA has created Physical Literacy and You (PLAY) Alberta to support, engage and connect Alberta communities in their efforts to use Physical Literacy as a resource for health and community development.

CHRONIC DISEASE
Cdn J of Public Health > Vol 104, No 7
Improvements were observed between 2005 and 2008 in terms of the proportion of adolescents having specific risk factors for T2D. The cause of these changes could not be determined. Continued monitoring of adolescent lifestyle habits and monitoring of exposure to health promotion programming is recommended.

COMMUNITY
Next Webinar March 3rd, 2014
To help grow strong, vibrant, and innovative communities by harnessing the power of collective impact through collaborative online training, resources, and shared experiences for leaders at all levels.

HEALTH GENERAL
This Guide is geared toward state and local government leaders who want to use intersectoral collaboration to promote healthy environments.

MENTAL HEALTH
This British Heart Foundation booklet is full of tips and tricks for lowering your stress levels and keeping your body and mind healthy. It comes with a planner to help you pinpoint likely ‘danger spots’ for stressful situations and plan in some stress-busting activities

Read about the HeAL Declaration and its five year targets for physical activity and mental health in this blog from the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM).

MISCELLANEOUS
This NICE guidance is for all those involved in helping people to change their behavior. It is particularly aimed at those who commission, design, investigate and deliver interventions to help people change their behavior – or who encourage or support behavior change as part of their role. This includes those who provide training on behavior change. The guidance may also be of interest to policy makers and researchers, as well as people who want to change their behavior.

Facilitating the movement from knowing, to agreeing, to doing and finally, to maintaining a new behavior, depends on more than just creating the perfect health communication campaign. For sustained change to happen, a campaign must be deployed with complementary behavior change strategies such as social engagement, behavioral economics and community-based social marketing. In recent years these strategies have gained considerable momentum and are now being widely recognized as key health communication allies for creating sustainable behavior change.

OLDER ADULTS
Later Life Training has released home exercise booklets in order to guide older adults on how to be active safely in their homes.

BMC Public Health 2013, 13:1100
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-1100
This article examines a unique data set from 712 US men who passed a rigorous physical exam in the 1940’s. These men participated in a survey 50 years later….. The striking finding from this study is that the single strongest predictor of later-life physical activity was whether the man had played varsity sport in high school. High school sport participation was also linked to fewer visits to the doctor in later life. 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
LRS wants to make Leicestershire, Leicester and Rutland the most sporting and physically active place in England 2025. Working with partners we want to provide physical activity opportunities to encourage people to move more often. Use the pages in this section to find out how healthy you are and what things you can do to live a healthy life.

Prev Chronic Dis 2014;11:130147.
Systematic Observation of Play and Recreation in Communities -  is a highly reliable observation instrument that can be used to collect data across diverse geographic settings and seasons by different users and has potential as a surveillance system.

This website gives individuals six options for tracking their eating and physical activity. The Physical Activity Tracker catalogs the frequency of any activity entered, whether exercise or occupation. In addition, there are places to track body weight, top 5 goals and recipes. The website is provided through the US Department of Agriculture.

From the British Heart Foundation. This simple guide to getting active includes information about why you should be active, and tells you how much and what type of activity you need to do to help your heart. It comes with a challenge chart to help you track your activity over a week and set yourself a goal for the future.

RURAL
A CHNET-WORKS! Webinar
March 4th, 2014 13:00 EST

A list of questionnaires that have been used to assess sedentary behaviour in the peer reviewed literature, provided in no particular order.  Where possible they’ve included links to the questionnaires themselves. 

WOMEN
February is Heart Health month and we're spreading the word that bicycling is a powerful -- and fun -- means to address the No. 1 killer of American women: heart disease.

Prev Chronic Dis 2014;11:130169.
Incorporating existing social media tools and motivational stories from young adult African American women in Internet-based tools may increase the feasibility, acceptability, and success of Internet-based physical activity programs in this high-risk, understudied population.



No comments: